Instagram - following 39

Instagram is an app that I use quite a lot I look at it more than a few times a day! I am currently trying to post to it daily. Whilst there are a number of things I could talk about regarding Instagram, today I just going to talk about the 39 accounts that I follow. Firstly I follow some friends and family which is a good way to see what is happening in their lives, children growing up, where they have travelled to and what they've had for breakfast?! The remainder are a mixture of musicians, photographers and artists.

I will say I am strict with who I follow - there are a number of reasons why I may unfollow: annoying content, no content, repetitive content. There are also some followers who I have a soft spot for, for example 'I like to paint monsters'. This is the account of the Chet Zar film and has been with me since the start. If you don't know who Chet Zar is, you should!

Looking at the 6 music accounts I follow Sarah Lipstate is the one I will talk about. Sarah is a alternative guitarist, she is a one woman show. She is a genius with an electric guitar and an array of pedals. Always making cool sounds that I like.

The 7 artist and photography accounts I follow are all people I admire and enjoy their work from the cinemagraphs that Nico Goodden produces to the candid street shots of New York that Daniel Arnold will post. Below is a full list of the accounts I follow. I am also lucky to personally know some of these people!

In summary I enjoy my followers but I am careful not to follow too many accounts. I don't want my feed full up of crap and what people had for breakfast. They must be accounts that I can gain inspiration from. Try it, go through the accounts that you follow and get rid of the dead wood so you don't have to filter through shit that some people post.

Erik Kim the photography blogger deleted his Instagram account even though he had thousands of followers as he said it was a 'life distraction' and that Instagram own the followers and not you - its their platform right! Actually Facebook own Instagram so more opportunity for them to make more money and have data on us. I get this and may be I will delete my Instagram account one day but currently I enjoy looking through the photos as I said. An alternative suggested by Erik is delete the app for a month and see how bad or good it can be?

Daniel Arnold 

James Barkman

James Jean

Jimmy Turrell

Nicholas Goodden

Rhiannon Rebecca Salisbury

I like to paint monsters

 

Adam Jones

Sarah Lipstate

Lawrence English

Loscil

Izotope

Ben Howard

Brixton, Sunday 30th July 2017

It was Sunday afternoon and I had a spare few hours. So I went for a walk around Brixton to see if I could find anything to photograph. Using my Leica C in P mode I took a number of shots of what I saw. With it being a Sunday a number of the shops were closed thus the shutters were down. Some colourful some not so, but these give a good background and a starting point. Its a case of framing the shot and waiting for (something or) someone interesting to walk in front. Another method was shooting from the hip as interesting people are walking past all the time. This method if you time it right can work well, whilst also being a non-contact way of shooting.

The four images below are some of what I captured. I like each images as they include a range (a loose sequence) man, woman, child and a caged animal.

reconnaissance

sunday 11am. I got the tube from Brixton to Pimlico. My aim was to shoot some long exposure shots of some of the architecture (near the river Thames) and include the moving clouds giving the sky that silky look. However once out of the tube at Pimlico looking up at the sky it was just white, overcast type clouds that weren't moving. Exactly what I didn't want.

But this was my only real opportunity to get out and shoot today so I wanted to make something. As I had my long exposure kit with me including my Manfrotto tripod and Cokin 10 stop filter I looked around to see what else would suit a long exposure shot, the river obvs! So I found a little paved balcony section on the north west side of the Vauxhall Bridge. I set up my tripod and set my camera to shutter priority I got it to 1/13 second whilst keeping the ISO as low as possible 100/200. I then used the Long Exposure Calculator app on my phone to work out what the shutter speed would be for another 10 stops. This gave me a shutter speed of 1 min 18 seconds. I put the camera into bulb mode, fixed the 10 stopper filter in place and using the Canon wireless remote I started the camera.

I waited 78 seconds for the camera to do its magic, and the results of my shot is the first image below. In Lightroom I changed the image to black and white and made a few adjustments. As you can see the image would have been so much better with definition in the sky, I could have added a graduated filter in Photoshop but to be honest I wanted to highlight (excuse the pun) what had happened. 

The second image was another long exposure even though you can't tell, this is again due to lack of movement in the sky. It would look much better with a smoky sky, but even so, I quite like this image. I used the same method as for the previous shot and amended a few things in Lightroom. I had to take the highlights down but apart from that not much was needed. I like the shape of the building - curves and lines etc.

Whilst these 2 shots weren't exactly what I was after I'm still happy with them. I will definitely be back at this location later in the year and shoot in the autumn/winter. Aiming to get more even longer exposures at night and probably looking to shoot colour, capturing different colour lights across the river etc.

Sunday Learning's

Last Sunday, my friend Matt and I ventured out for a bit of a photo walk. Matt had his Ricoh G2 and I had my Leica C - both good street photography cameras. Small and understated camera's that have great results when used on manual or program settings. My Leica has the zoom option which I find very useful allowing me to get some good abstract shots.

We met up at Shoreditch High Street overground in London early afternoon. It was packed with people being cool (it's Shoreditch!) and just being out in the sun. After walking around trying to find interesting things to possibly photograph some things were getting in the way. People, there were too many, yes of course you want people in street photography (actually not everyone does). 

Too many people, they were all getting in each others way and obviously ours.

Secondly it was too hot the light was so bright and not a cloud in the sky, it was difficult to get a good shot and see it.

Thirdly everyone seemed to have a massive camera, I think there were some graffiti tours or something going on as lots of people were taking photos with huge expensive looking DSLR's.

Whilst its great that people are out taking photos as soon as I saw this I almost hid my camera, I didn't want to be a tourist. I'm not I know, but being seen with my camera I could be one. So stealth became part of the walk, however after being out for an hour dodging people and tourist groups, I noticed the red battery indicator was flashing. Within 5 minutes the battery was dead. (My fault.)

So rather than take no more photos, I started taking some on my iphone 5s. I used the hipstamatic app which is cool for street photography. After a few minutes of shooting I was used to it and it was cool and I enjoyed it, however the heat had gotten to both of us. We retired to Victoria Park which was again full of people but there was ample space for us both to sit down and have a can of beer whilst reviewing some of the shots we'd taken.

Learnings - I don't need a massive camera, I made the best of what I had, check the weather, dress accordingly don't go where there are too many people, charge your battery before you go out (school boy error).

why i shoot film

anyone can shoot digital all you need is your phone. This is only possible because of digital. When I want to make a photo I want to have full control how I make it. Meaning I understand the settings I am using and how that will help me make the picture I want. 

In addition to this (capture) freedom, you are able to choose the type of film you want to use. There are the obvious ones portra 400 and the trx one (which are both lush) but I like to buy a load of 35mm expired film off eBay and see what results they produce. These films whilst all having their own qualities have different speeds. ISO rates. This again in my eyes makes the film camera process a more intricate, involved and a more appealing process.

Not seeing your photos is also cool part. Yeh I just said that! But when you shoot a roll of film and don't see the results immediately to look at for 5 seconds you will understand. The fact that I mentally leave those pictures and keep them on the film. Makes them all that more sweeter when I get the film developed and then get to see the results. Allows me to reengage with them remembering the time, place, people etc

Making less photographs is also cool. Yeh I just said that as well! Each shot is a more careful act. As you only get 36 or 24 exposures each film (if shooting 35mm film) each capture is more precious. I think it's just as good not to take a photo as it is to take a photo. It means that you have seen a point of interested, composed it, thought about whether it will work. And your photographic analysis that film requires says theres something better around the corner.

From a commercial point of view film probably won't work for me due to the limitations. But from a personal aspect I am definitely a more film kind of guy.

 

the barbican - is one of my favourites

The Barbican is luckily a short walk from my office in London, and to be honest I don't go there as much as I should. There are so many photo opportunities normally I would look to people and what they are doing. But at the Barbican it is the architecture that grabs my attention every time.